Vanwege het Corona virus is het nog onduidelijk hoe het onderwijs precies verzorgd gaat worden. Zie voor de actuele informatie de betreffende vakpagina’s op Blackboard/Brightspace.

Studiegids

nl en

Science Methodology (SCM)

Vak
2020-2021

Admission requirements

This information is without prejudice. Alterations can be made for next year until August 31 2020.
The course is meant for MSc and PhD students in any of the natural sciences who are performing scientific research projects.

Obligatory course for all MSc students Chemistry and all MSc students Life Science and Technology. Available as an elective course for students in other MSc programmes.

Description

During the BSc and MSc education, students learn lots of scientific facts, but do they know how science works? In this course the basic principles of the methodology used in the natural sciences are taught. The aim is to let the student contemplate on concepts like ‘truth’, ‘experiments’, ‘models’, ‘confirmation/falsification’ and make the student aware of the limitations of the ability to make objective observations. Also current practices, like the mechanisms of research funding, ‘publish or perish’ dogma and the importance of impact as well as integrity and ethics in science will be discussed.

Course objectives

At the end of the course students:

  • have a basic knowledge of the philosophy of science

  • have a basic understanding of modern scientific practices

  • can critically discuss aspects of the scientific enterprise orally as well as in writing

  • can critically discuss the relation of science and society orally as well as in writing

Timetable

Schedule information can be found on the website of the MSc programmes Chemistry and LST.

Mode of instruction

Lectures, group discussions and essay writing and evaluation

Assessment method

Essay of 2500 words (100%)

Reading list

Materials will be provided via Brightspace:
Papers from the literature
Slides presented during the courses

Registration

Register for this course via uSis

Contact

Prof. Dr. M. Ubbink, Dr. R.W. Runhardt

Remarks