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The Middle East in the International Political Economy

Vak
2021-2022

Admission requirements

Admission to the MA Middle Eastern Studies, MA Middle Eastern Studies (research), or MA International Relations.

Students who do not have a background in Middle East studies or in the political economy of the Middle East are expected to read the following two books prior to the start of the course:
1. Melani Cammett, Ishac Diwan, Alan Richards, and John Waterbury. A Political Economy of the Middle East, 4th Edition. Boulder: Westview Press, 2015 (Available online via Leiden Library catalogue);
2. Adam Hanieh. Lineages of Revolt: Issues of Contemporary Capitalism in the Middle East. Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2013 (Available online via Leiden Library catalogue).

The number of places available in this course are limited. Therefore, read the information below under registration carefully.

Students who are not admitted to one of the abovementioned programmes can only be admitted to the course, if there are places left. Interested students may mail the Student advisor mentioning the course title, their name and their student ID number in the subject line. If they are admitted, they will be enrolled for the course by September 6 at the latest.

Description

This course analyses the Middle East in the Global Political Economy. Overall, it surveys the field of international political economy (IPE) and examines the interactions of the Middle East within the global economic order. It seeks to familiarise students with the various roles of commodities, labour, and finance across the region. In so doing, it not only examines that which is unique about the political economy of the region but also the ways in which the region is more integrated and less exceptional than often purported. The course begins with a theoretical orientation to the field of IPE, and proceeds to situate the region within the field in historical and contemporary debates. The remainder of the course progresses thematically, examining topics such as oil and energy markets, trade, financial crisis, labour, global value chains, and integration.

Course objectives

  • Understand the broad theoretical debates within the field of Global Political Economy

  • Evaluate the role of various Middle Eastern states in the GPE

  • Assess the impact of oil on the region

  • Examine flows of capital, labour, and technology across the region

  • Deepen understanding of the various economic challenges and opportunities facing the region, considering historical and potential future trajectories

  • Articulate how changes in the global economic order and technological innovation impact domestic, regional, and international economic development

  • Discuss historical and contemporary trends in the Middle East, and the region’s interactions with the global economic order

  • Analyse the impact of global, transnational, state, and non-state actors on domestic and regional development

  • Interpret the constraints, challenges, and prospects for greater economic integration

  • Critically identify and assess questions and developments relevant to IPE in the region, examine them with the scholarly rigor expected at the MA level, and formulate research questions and projects around these puzzles and problems

  • Apply knowledge gained to critically assess scholarship and IPE developments in the region, and communicate their interpretations in written and verbal forms

Timetable

The timetables are available through My Timetable.

Mode of instruction

  • Seminar

Attendance and active participation are obligatory for seminars. Students are required to prepare for and attend all sessions. The convenors need to be informed without delay of any classes missed for a good reason (i.e. due to unforeseen circumstances). In these cases, it is up to the discretion of the convener(s) of the course whether or not the missed class will have to be made up with an extra assignment. The maximum of such absences during a semester is two. Being absent without notification and/or more than two times will result in exclusion from the term end exams and a failing grade for the course.

Assessment method

Assessment and weighing

Partial Assessment Weighing
Engagement (e.g. active, informed participation 10%
Discussant duties 15%
Presentation 25%
Final paper 50%

The final mark for this course is formed by the weighted average.

In order to pass the course, students must obtain an overall mark of 5.50 (=6) or higher.

The course is an integrated whole. All assessment parts must be completed in the same academic year. No partial marks can be carried over into following years.

Students must complete the assignments on time. Late submissions will result in a deduction of grades as follows: 1-24 hrs late = -0.5; 24-48 hrs late = -1.0; 48-72 hrs late = -1.5; 72-96 hrs late = -2.0. Assignments will not be accepted more than four days after the deadline, including weekends and will be graded with 1.0.

(The paper deadline mentioned in uSis is a fictional date for administration purposes only. The actual date will be communicated by the convener of the course.)

Resit

Only if the total weighted average is insufficient (5.49 or lower) and the insufficient grade is the result of an insufficient paper, a re-sit of the tinal paper (50%) is possible. In that case the convener of the course may decide to assign a (new) topic. The deadline for this version will be determined in consultation.

A re-sit for other course components is not possible.

Exam review

How and when a review will take place will be disclosed together with the publication of the exam results (in Brightspace) at the latest.

Reading list

Articles and book chapters can be found on the library catalogue or online. The list of readings will be available in the course syllabus, on Brightspace.

All reading materials must be read in advance of class. Students should arrive at class having examined the material thoroughly, and therefore ready to engage thoughtfully in seminar discussions.

Tentative Seminar Topics
1. Analysing the Global Political Economy
2. Situating the Middle East in the GPE: Beyond Exceptionalism
3. Globalization: Forces, Trends, and Development
4. Colonial Legacies and Interactions in the Global Economy
5. Hydrocarbons and Energy Markets
6. Global Institutions and Business Politics: State, Society, and Region
7. Labour Flows and Migration
8. Integration and Regionalism
9. Production and Power: From Local Production to Global Value Chains
10. Trade and Foreign Direct Investment
11. Gender, work, and the global political economy
12. Global Finance, Sovereign Wealth Funds, and Commodity Markets
13. Dealing with Crises: Financial Crisis and Political Upheaval

Registration

MA Middle Eastern Studies students may enroll directly through uSis. The number of places is limited and the principle is first come, first served.

MA Middle Eastern Studies (research) students are strongly advised to opt for the Research MA version of the course. They may enroll directly through uSis. The number of places is limited and the principle is first come, first served.
Students opting for the regular MA version should contact their Coordinator of Studies, dr. N.A.N.M. van Os for information on the enrollment procedure.

MA International Studies students should contact their Coordinator of Studies, Drs. E.J. Walstra for information on the enrollment procedure.

Contact

Remarks