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Studiegids

nl en

Classical Texts: Russell

Vak
2012-2013

Admission requirements

Admission to this course is restricted to second-year students in the BA Plus-traject of the BA Philosophy.

Description

In 1912 Bertrand Russell published his “shilling shocker” The Problems of Philosophy at Oxford University Press. The book is still in print and can be found on the net: it is truly a classic. The book tries to combine traditional foundational epistemology with British empiricism against the background of the insights of modern logic: Russell was after all one of the two authors of Principia Mathematica. (This, however, is not a reason for worry: the book is entirely untechnical and does not employ formulae.)

The course will study the fifteen chapters of this short (100 pages only!) book, with regard to doctrinal, historical, and linguistic aspects, with suitable assignments every week. The weekly sessions will be a mixture of seminar and lecture. Among other things we shall search for adequate Dutch translations for crucial epistemological terms.

Course objectives

Course objectives will be made available on Blackboard at the start of the course.

Timetable

See Collegeroosters Wijsbegeerte 2012-2013, BA Wijsbegeerte, BA Plus-traject, tweede jaar.

Mode of instruction

Lectures and seminars.

Assessment method

  • Students are required to take active part in the weekly sessions

  • Take home examination

Blackboard

Blackboard will be used for posting of messages, texts, and assigments.

Reading list

  • Bertrand Russell, The Problems of Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 1912 (and many later editions, also available on the net in various versions).

Registration

Please register for this course on uSis.
See Inschrijven voor cursussen en tentamens

Registration à la carte en contractonderwijs

Not applicable.

Contact information

Prof.dr. B.G. Sundholm

Remarks

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