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Thematic Seminar: Global History of Work and Labour Organisations

Vak
2018-2019

Admission requirements

This course is only available for students in the BA International Studies programme.
The number of participants is limited to 25.

Description

This course addresses the complex historical question of labour and capital as well as labour exploitation and internationalisation of the labour question in different parts of the world. Case studies will not be confined to any particular geographical area. In adopting a “global” approach, the aim is to focus equal attention on the rich part of the world (the so-called “global North”) and the rest of the world (the so-called “global-South”).
A range of topics related to labour history and labour organisations will be covered in seeking to better appreciate modern-day global capitalism as part of a historical process driven by working peoples. These topics will include: trade unions, labour legislation and labour relations.
Labour is an important factor of production. The course will cover different modes of production from antique to feudal, from proto-capitalist to capitalist modes of production. Contemporary issues, problems such as precarisation of labour and life, technological transformations, will also be analysed.
The work and perspectives of prominent philosophers, economists, and historians will be examined. Students are required to select particular case studies with related literature and other sources (audio-video material, newspapers, archival material, novels, movies, etc.).
The essay will be on issues and case studies pertaining to labour history: trade unions’ history, ILO history, history of wealth formation and the rich/capitalists, and history of technological changes in relation to labour.

Additionally, the students will work through:

  • W.C. Booth, G.G. Colomb, J.W. Williams, The Craft of Research, third edition, Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Course objectives

The Thematic Seminars for International Studies are designed to teach students how to deal with state-of-the-art literature and research questions. They are chosen to enhance the students’ learning experience by building on the multidisciplinary perspectives they have developed so far, and to introduce them to the art of academic research. They are characterised by an international or comparative approach.

Academic skills that are trained include:

Oral and written presentation skills:

1. To explain clear and substantiated research results.
2. To provide an answer to questions concerning (a subject) in the field covered by the course:

  • in the form of a clear and well-structured oral presentation;

  • in agreement with the appropriate disciplinary criteria;

  • using up-to-date presentation techniques;

  • using relevant illustration or multimedia techniques;

  • aimed at a specific audience.
    3. To actively participate in a discussion following the presentation.

Collaboration skills:

1. To be socio-communicative in collaborative situations.
2. To provide and receive constructive criticism, and incorporate justified criticism by revising one’s own position.
3. To adhere to agreed schedules and priorities.

Basic research skills, including heuristic skills:

1. To collect and select academic literature using traditional and digital methods and techniques.
2. To analyze and assess this literature with regard to quality and reliability.
3. To formulate on this basis a sound research question.
4. To design under supervision a research plan of limited scope, and implement it using the methods and techniques that are appropriate within the discipline involved.
5. To formulate a substantiated conclusion.

Timetable

The timetable is available on the BA International Studies website.

Mode of instruction

Seminars

Seminars are held every week, with the exception of the Midterm Exam week. This includes supervised research.

Course Load

Total course load for this course is 10 EC (1 EC = 28 hours), which equals 280 hours, broken down by:

  • Attending seminars (2 hours per week x 12): 24 hours

  • Reading literature: 80 hours

  • Preparing assignments: 50 hours

  • Oral presentation: 25 hours

  • Writing the final research essay: 101 hours.

Assessment method

Assessment and Weighing

Partial grade Weighing
Attendance 10%
Assignment (research project) 10%
Presentation 30%
Final Research Essay (5,000 words) 50%

End Grade

To successfully complete the course, please take note that the End Grade of the course is established by determining the weighted average of all assessment components.

Resit

Students who have been active participants in class and submitted the Final Essay on time, but scored an overall insufficient mark, are entitled to a resit. For the resit, students are given a chance to hand in a new version of the Final Essay.
In case of resubmission of the Final Essay (insufficient grade only) the final grade for the Essay will be lowered as a consequence of the longer process of completion. The deadline for resubmission is 10 working days after receiving the grade for the Final Essay.

Retaking a passing grade

Please consult the Course and Examination Regulations 2018 – 2019.

Exam review

How and when an exam review takes place will be determined by the examiner. This review will be within 30 days after official publication of exam results.

Blackboard

Blackboard will be used for the seminars. Students are requested to enroll on Blackboard, but only after correct enrolment in uSis.

Reading list

The reading material will be uploaded by the teacher via Blackboard together with the syllabus. There will be no need to purchase books. This literature should be downloaded, printed and read by the students before coming to class. It is conceivable that a very limited amount of audio-video material will also be used.

Additionally, the students will work through:

  • W.C. Booth, G.G. Colomb, J.W. Williams, The Craft of Research, third edition, Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Registration

  • Enrolment through uSis for Thematic Seminars is mandatory.

  • The Thematic Seminars make use of a waiting list for the enrolment in uSis. If you are on the waiting list for a Thematic Seminar, this does not guarantee you a spot in this Seminar.

  • Enrolment in only one Seminar is allowed. Students are more than welcome to remain on one or more waiting lists, as well as an actual enrolment.

  • If a Thematic Seminar and its corresponding waiting list is no longer available for enrolment in uSis, this means it is full. Do not try to obtain a spot through other means.

  • If you are unsure of your enrolment status for a Thematic Seminar, please contact the BAIS Administration Department.

  • General information about uSis is available here.

Registration Studeren à la carte and Contractonderwijs

Not applicable.

Contact

Stefano Bellucci

When contacting your lecturer, please include your full name, student number, and course title.

Remarks

The deadline for submission of the Final Essay is Friday 7 June 2019.