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Prospectus

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Economic and Consumer Psychology

Course
2021-2022

Entry requirements

All 60 ec of the first-year in Psychology obtained.

Description

Economic and consumer behaviour is to a large extent social behaviour, which means that understanding social cognition is essential to understanding economic and consumer behaviour. This course provides advanced knowledge of social cognition (theories, paradigms, empirical findings) and of how this knowledge can in turn be applied to understand and influence economic and consumer behaviour. The course consists of 2 complementary parts: lectures and work group sessions. The lectures will provide a solid theoretical basis in social cognition. The work group sessions consist of discussion meetings on assigned readings. The discussions are initiated by students’ presentations of the topics. Students are encouraged to think actively about the assigned readings and topics by developing essay questions for each work group session.

Course objectives

Upon completion of the course, students are able to:

  • recognize and reproduce knowledge about the most important theories, paradigms, and empirical findings in the field of social cognition;

  • apply knowledge of social cognition to understand and analyse economic and consumer behaviour;

  • explain, discuss, and report on problems regarding economic and consumer behaviour; and

  • has further developed his or her academic skills through reading, presenting, assessing, and discussing recent literature on economic and consumer behaviour.

Timetable

For the timetable of this course please refer to MyTimetable

Registration

NOTE As of the academic year 2021-2022, you must register for all courses in uSis. You do this twice a year: once for the courses you want to take in semester 1 and once for the courses you want to take in semester 2.
Registration for courses in the first semester is possible from July. Registration for courses in the first semester is possible from December.
The exact date on which the registration starts will be published on the website of the Student Service Center (SSC). First year Bachelor students as well as premaster students will be registered by the Student Service Center; they do not need to register themselves.

The registration period for all courses closes five calendar days before the start of the course.
Also read the complete registration procedure

Elective

Elective students have to enroll for each course separately. For admission requirements contact your study advisor.

Mode of instruction

Eight two-hour lectures and eight two-hour mandatory work group sessions.

Assessment method

Examination consisting of multiple-choice and essay questions (50%) and work group sessions assignments (50%). The book Social Cognition (Fiske & Taylor, 2013) and the information presented in the lectures are part of the examination material. The examination is in English and can be answered in either Dutch or English. Work group sessions and the work group session assignments are in Dutch or English.

The Institute of Psychology uses fixed rules for grade calculation and compulsory attendance. It also follows the policy of the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences to systematically check student papers for plagiarism with the help of software. Disciplinary measures will be taken when fraud is detected. Students are expected to be familiar with and understand the implications of these three policies.

Reading list

Lecture Readings:

  • Fiske, S. T., & Taylor, S. E. (2013/2017). Social cognition: From brains to culture (2nd/3rd ed.). London: Sage. ISBN-13: 978-1473969308
    You can chose which edition you would like to use, but the teachers work with the 2017 version. Note there is now also a 2020 version available with some minor changes.
    Seminar Readings:

  • Loveland, K. E., Smeesters, D., & Mandel, N. (2010). Still preoccupied with 1995: The need to belong and preference for nostalgic products. Journal of Consumer Research, 37(3), 393-408.

  • Griskevicius, V., & Kenrick, D. T. (2013). Fundamental motives: How evolutionary needs influence consumer behavior. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 23(3), 372-386.

  • Vriens, M., Vidden, C., & Schomaker, J. (2020). What I see is what I want: Top-down attention biasing choice behavior. Journal of Business Research, 111, 262-269.

  • Yang, M., & Roskos-Ewoldsen, D. R. (2007). The effectiveness of brand placements in the movies: Levels of placements, explicit and implicit memory, and brand-choice behavior. Journal of Communication, 57(3), 469-489.

  • Carter, T. J., & Gilovich, T. (2012). I am what I do, not what I have: The differential centrality of experiential and material purchases to the self. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 102(6), 1304-1317.

  • Mochon, D., Norton, M. I., & Ariely, D. (2012). Bolstering and restoring feelings of competence via the IKEA effect. International Journal of Research in Marketing, 29(4), 363-369.

  • Cho, H., & Schwarz, N. (2008). Of great art and untalented artists: Effort information and the flexible construction of judgmental heuristics. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 18(3), 205-211.

  • Nash, J. G., & Rosenthal, R. A. (2014). An investigation of the endowment effect in the context of a college housing lottery. Journal of Economic Psychology, 42, 74-82.

  • Winterich, K. P., Gangwar, M., & Grewal, R. (2018). When celebrities count: Power distance beliefs and celebrity endorsements. Journal of Marketing, 82(3), 70-86.

  • Cheung, C. M. Y., Sia, C. L., & Kuan, K. K. (2012). Is this review believable? A study of factors affecting the credibility of online consumer reviews from an ELM perspective. Journal of the Association for Information Systems, 13(8), 618-635.

  • Aaker, J., Vohs, K. D., & Mogilner, C. (2010). Nonprofits are seen as warm and for-profits as competent: Firm stereotypes matter. Journal of Consumer Research, 37(2), 224-237.

  • Grau, S. L., & Zotos, Y. C. (2016). Gender stereotypes in advertising: A review of current research. International Journal of Advertising, 35(5), 761-770.

  • Antonetti, P., & Maklan, S. (2014). Feelings that make a difference: How guilt and pride convince consumers of the effectiveness of sustainable consumption choices. Journal of Business Ethics, 124(1), 117-134.

  • Grégoire, Y., Tripp, T. M., & Legoux, R. (2009). When customer love turns into lasting hate: The effects of relationship strength and time on customer revenge and avoidance. Journal of Marketing, 73(6), 18-32.

Contact information

Dr. Marco van Bommel m.van.bommel@fsw.leidenuniv.nl