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Prospectus

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Economic development and social change in Southeast Asia

Course
2014-2015

Admission requirements

-

Description

This research seminar explores the recent economic development in one of the world’s most exciting regions. By looking at assessments in the secondary literature as well as supporting statistics, we seek to gain an understanding of why certain nations in Southeast Asia have achieved a spectacular economic growth performance while lagging behind in terms of social development. The course adopts a historical perspective reaching back to independence after the Second World War. Particular attention is given to the role of institutions in economic and social development, especially the state. The seminar concludes with explanations and social impact of the financial crisis that hit the region in the late 1990s. Students introduce assigned readings and choose a specific topic for individual research based on primary sources such as government reports and statistics. Their research culminates in an essay of about 6,000 words.

Course objectives

General learning objectives:

  • The ability to independently identify and select sources

  • The ability to independently formulate a clear and well-argued research question

  • The ability to analyze and evaluate literature and sources for the purpose of producing an original scholarly argument

  • The ability to interpret a corpus of sources

  • Knowledge and comprehension of the specialization Economic History and its historiography specifically:

  • the development of global governance in the twentieth century, as well as the most important debates in recent Economic History, also the application of economic concepts, research methods or models, and insight into the argumentation of current debates.

Course-specific learning objectives include a achieving a broad overview of post-war trends in economic development and social change in the region of Southeast Asia, including a specialization on one or more ASEAN member states.

Additional learning objectives apply to Research Master students as follows:

  • The ability to interpret a potentially complex corpus of sources

  • The ability to identify new approaches within existing academic debates

  • Knowledge of the interdisciplinary aspects of the specialization.

Timetable

Timetable History

Mode of instruction

  • Seminar

Course Load

Total: 280 hours,

  • Class attendance 28 hours.

  • General literature 56 hours.

  • Presentations 16 hours.

  • Term paper 180 hours.

Assessment method

Final assessment is based on the following components:

  • Active participation in the course, including attendance, discussion, at least 2 presentations, including one concerning the individual topic of research.

  • A final paper of 6000 words

The paper shows

  • The ability to independently identify and select sources

  • The ability to independently formulate a clear and well-argued research question

  • The ability to analyze and evaluate literature and sources for the purpose of producing an original scholarly argument

  • The ability to interpret a corpus of sources

  • The ability to give a clear written report on the research results in English or Dutch,

  • The ability to independently identify and select literature

The presentation and participation show

  • The ability to give a clear oral report on the research results in English or Dutch

  • The ability to provide constructive academic feedback

  • The ability to engage actively with other students (participation)

  • The ability to engage with constructive academic feedback (participation)

The final grade for the course is established by determining the weighted average. The weighting is 33 % for participation in all its aspects and 67 % for the final paper.

The specific learning objectives for Research Master students are incorporated in the substantive evaluation of their oral and written reports.

Blackboard

Blackboard is used for this course:

  • Dissemination of information to participants

  • For references to literature

  • Sharing reports of oral and written presentaations by participants and lecturers.

Reading list

Selected readings from recent literature will be announced at the first meeting.

Registration

via uSis

Contact

Dr. Thomas Lindblad
Prof. David Henley

Remarks

This course is offered to students of economic history in the specialization Migration and Global Interdependence in the MA programme History and students with a specialization in Southeast Asian studies in the MA programme Asian Studies. It is also accessible to students of the History of European Expansion and Globalisation and students of Asian Studies with a specialization in Politics, Society and Economy. In addition, it is open MA research students in History and Asian Studies.