Prospectus

nl en

Introduction

Scientific methodology is an important approach in modern archaeology and it is at the heart of archaeological science. Hypotheses, data, theory, experiments, observations, as well as presentation and interpretation, are all key to our understanding of our past.

The MSc Archaeological Science consists of 4 focus areas (also see the tabs above):
* Archaeobotany and Archaeozoology
* Human Osteoarchaeology
* Material Culture Studies
* Digital Archaeology

Archaeobotany and Archaeozoology

Archaeobotany and Archaeozoology

Archaeobotany and Archaeozoology focuses on a variety of palaeo-zoological and palaeo-botanical topics, ranging in age from the Palaeolithic to historical periods.
This focus area revolves around palaeo-environmental or palaeo-economical questions as well as evolutionary aspects of faunal or floral communities, and the evolution of species. In the Faculty’s specialised laboratories, small and large mammals are studied, as well as pollen and plant macro remains (including wood).

Apart from practical work, relevant excursions and fieldwork, a large part of the programme is intended for writing the thesis. In this thesis, the results of practical investigations are presented, combined with literature studies. During the programme, you are confronted with the application of aDNA and isotope studies in the field of palaeo-zoological and palaeo-botanical research. The regular programme is supplemented with lectures by guest speakers, including international speakers.

Staff
Dr. M.H. (Mike) Field
Dr. L. (Laura) Llorente Rodriguez

Course EC Semester 1 Semester 2

General part

Scientific Methodology in Archaeology 5
Fieldwork / Internship 5
Master Thesis Archaeology and Thesis Tutorial 20

Focus area 1: Archaeobotany and Archaeozoology

Palaeoecology and Quaternary Stratigraphy: A Basic Introduction 5
Current Issues in Quaternary Research 5

Focus area 2

Archaeology: Focus area 2 10

Laboratory work

Laboratory Work for Archaeobotany and Archaeozoology 5

Elective

Elective course 5

Human Osteoarchaeology

Human Osteoarchaeology

This focus area provides you with a detailed background of the methods used to study human bones and teeth in physical anthropology and archaeology. It offers a solid foundation in skeletal and dental anatomy, as well as an understanding of the histology of skeletal tissues, morphological variations, and changes that come with age and/or sex.

The degree also considers diseases that can be diagnosed from bones and teeth and the palaeo-epidemiological insights which can be drawn from them. Furthermore, you are introduced to the methods and standards associated with ancient DNA and isotope analysis.
This focus area teaches procedures for the excavation of skeletonised human remains along with the standards used for recording them.
In addition, special attention is paid to taphonomic changes that can take place within the grave context. If possible, the osteological laboratory will organise its own excavation.

*Please note:
There are prerequisites and a minimum grade point average required for admission to this specialisation. Depending upon an applicant’s experience and motivation those lacking these requirements may be invited to participate in a pre-Master’s qualification programme.*

Staff
Dr. M.L.P. (Menno) Hoogland
Dr. S.A. (Sarah) Schrader
Dr. R. (Rachel) Schats

Course EC Semester 1 Semester 2

General part

Scientific Methodology in Archaeology 5
Fieldwork / Internship 5
Master Thesis Archaeology and Thesis Tutorial 20

Focus area 1: Human Osteoarchaeology

Human Osteology 5
Research Methods in Mortuary Archaeology 5

Focus area 2

Archaeology: Focus area 2 10

Laboratory work

Laboratory Work for Human Osteoarchaeology 5

Elective

Elective course 5

Material Culture Studies

Material Culture Studies

Material Culture Studies revolves around the analysis of the cultural biographies of all sorts of material objects from flint axes, to pottery, to houses and monumental structures. Our aim is the reconstruction of technological processes by examining the interconnectivity of different chaînes opératoires in order to better understand the varied relationships between people and things.

The programme’s courses deal with current approaches in material culture theory, analytical methods and techniques employed in artefact studies, and experimental archaeology. Experiments are central in both our research and teaching and are conducted in the experimental laboratory as well as in our experimental outdoor setting of Huize Horsterwold, the Stone Age hamlet we have constructed over the past few years and have been using as our experimental station. In June 2016 we have started the construction of an additional experimental Stone Age house located in Vlaardingen. We specialise in provenience studies of various raw materials and wear trace and residue analysis, using primarily microscopic and chemical analytical techniques. These specialisations are taught in laboratory tutorials.

From 2017 onwards, Material Culture Studies also incorporates a range of architectural research projects currently conducted at the Faculty. This includes the study of (monumental) architecture which is approached as an object in itself, and is placed in its larger landscape context. As such, Material Culture Studies combines, both in its physical and theoretical approaches, landscape and object-oriented studies and contexts.

Staff
Prof. dr. A.N. (Ann) Brysbaert
Prof. dr. A.L. (Annelou) van Gijn
Prof. dr. P.A.I.H. (Patrick) Degryse
Drs. M. (Martina) Revello Lami
V. (Valerio) Gentile

Course EC Semester 1 Semester 2

General part

Scientific Methodology in Archaeology 5
Fieldwork / Internship 5
Master Thesis Archaeology and Thesis Tutorial 20

Focus area 1: Material Culture Studies

Seminar Material Culture Studies: Crafts and Society 5
Techniques of Artefact Analysis 5

Focus area 2

Archaeology: Focus area 2 10

Laboratory work

Laboratory Work for Material Culture Studies 5

Elective

Elective course 5

Digital Archaeology

Digital Archaeology

Digital Archaeology is concerned with digital data for archaeological research, and the computational methods and tools required to collect, analyse and manage it.

The use of computers in archaeology goes back to the 1960s, and today archaeology is one of the most digitised disciplines among the historical and social sciences. Computer-based tools such as spatial analysis, 3D modelling, simulation, image analysis and others have opened up new avenues for archaeological enquiry, significantly broadening our understanding of the human past.
Our expertise in survey, remote sensing, spatial analysis and data management covers the whole workflow of archaeological research.

Students of Digital Archaeology will learn to collect digital data in the field using our state-of-the-art surveying equipment, and to process, visualise, analyse, interpret, manage and present digital data in our computer laboratory. Our network of national and international partners provides ample opportunity of hands-on training and exchange.

Staff
Dr. K. (Karsten) Lambers
Dr. C. (Chiara) Piccoli

Course EC Semester 1 Semester 2

General part

Scientific Methodology in Archaeology 5
Fieldwork / Internship 5
Master Thesis Archaeology and Thesis Tutorial 20

Focus area 1: Digital Archaeology

Digital Data Acquisition and Analysis 5
Computational Methods in Archaeology 5

Focus area 2

Archaeology: Focus area 2 10

Laboratory work

Laboratory Work for Digital Archaeology 5

Elective

Elective course 5