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Prospectus

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Political Science: International Relations and Organisations (The Hague)

Course registration:

In the first semester, students are registered for all the lectures and workgroup sessions of Academic Skills and Statistics in block I and block II by the Student Services Centre (SSC). All courses are mandatory. It is not possible to change your registration for the workgroups. The workgroup instructor for Academic Skills 1 and 2 will also be your mentor during the first semester.
As of the second semester, IRO students must register for courses themselves in uSis. Registration for all lectures and workgroups in block III and IV is open during the following periods:

Block III: from 6 December 2017, 10:00 hrs until 28 January 2018, 23:59 hrs
Block IV: from 6 December 2017, 10:00 hrs until 25 March 2018, 23:59 hrs.

Please be sure to register for all lectures and workgroups, including the Academic Skills workgroups. Make sure you register in time, as some workgroups may fill quickly.

Exam registration:

IRO students must register themselves for the exams and retakes in uSis. Registration for exams and retakes is possible from 100 days up to 11 days before the exam or retake will take place. If you do not register on time, you cannot take part in the exam or retake, unless you receive special permission from the Board of Examiners to register late.
Tip: Register for your exams when you register for the lectures and workgroups

Year 1

Studying International Relations and Organisations is a full-time job; it will take you 40 hours a week on average. Attending lectures, tutorials, and work group sessions will take about 16 hours; these are the contact hours. The rest of the time you will study independently or with your fellow students preparing for the lectures and work group sessions, writing assignments and essays, and reading.

During the first year of the programme, you acquaint yourself with the basics of the political science discipline and international politics. Furthermore, you will study related subjects, such as economics and history. An important part of the programme is reserved for skills courses, where you practice text analysis, debating, and academic writing.

You attend lectures with all IRO students from the same year. The work groups consist of about 24 students, and during the work group sessions you actively work with your fellow students on deepening and processing the knowledge you have gained from the lectures and your reading.

Structure

The academic year runs from early September to July and consists of two semesters, each divided into two blocks. A block covers 8 weeks, with 7 weeks of teaching and one exam week. At the university, we use the European Credits Transfer System (ECTS) to represent the workload of courses. Each year of the three-year programme consists of 60 EC. One EC stands for 28 hours of studying.

Course EC Semester 1 Semester 2

Block I - IV

Mentoring Sessions

Block I

Academic Skills 1: Text interpretation 3
International Organisations 5
Introduction to International Relations 5

Block II

Academic Skills 2: Argumentation 2
Statistics 1 - Description and Inference 5
Actors in World Politics 5
Economics for Political Scientists 5

Block III

Academic Skills 3: Book Review 2
Statistics 2 - Applied Quantitative Analysis 5
Global History 5
Introduction to Comparative Politics 5

Block IV

Academic Skills 4 - Critical Review 3
Introduction to Political Science 5
Politics of the European Union 5

Module on career preparation

Description

Why did you decide to study Political Science or the International Relations and Organisations (IRO) variant? How do you want to use it in the future? The Political Science programme does not educate students for one specific profession, and its graduates can be found in many different places on the job market. This is the focus of the Job Market Preparation module. Students are faced with many choices and options during their studies and their career. The choices you make as a student – the courses you follow, the (research) assignments you carry out, the questions you ask yourself – all help to steer your future career in a particular direction. In the Job Market Preparation module, your aim is to discover your own strengths, wishes and options.

Course objectives

The key questions of the module are: ‘What do I want?’; ‘What can I do?’; ‘What should I be able to do?’ and ‘How do I achieve my goals?’ More specifically, the learning objectives of this module are as follows:
Students learn practical skills – study skills (planning skills, strategic studying, time management) and academic and professional skills (first-year Academic Skills track) – that enable them to study successfully (learning objective for the first year).
Students further develop their professional and academic skills (second-year Academic Skills track). On the basis of their acquired understanding of the professional field of Political Scientists, students make well-informed decisions about their academic career, which match their personal competencies and work-related wishes (learning objective for the second year).
Students acquire the practical skills they need when applying for jobs, such as producing a good CV, writing application letters, effective networking and interview skills (learning objective for the third year).
Students learn to reflect on their own learning, and can link the knowledge, skills and experiences from the study programme to options and wishes for their own future professional career (learning objective for all years).

Mode of instruction

The Job Market Preparation module consists of various plenary sessions, work group sessions and other assignments / activities offered at different times during the three years of the bachelor’s programme. In each case, the focus will be on different questions and topics, as appropriate for the various phases of study and development. This will partly involve assignments / activities that are integrated within regular courses of the study programme, by means of the skills education courses in the first and second years, and components within other courses, such as guest speakers who talk about professional opportunities for Political Scientists, excursions / work visits, and practical assignments, such as writing policy memos, advice reports and opinion articles (see also ‘Interrelation with bachelor’s courses’ at the end of this document). Another aspect that links up with job market preparation is the option of doing an internship (15 EC), where students can gain practical work experience as a way to fill their elective credits in the third year. This component is described elsewhere in the e-Prospectus (see: ‘Elective credits’).

Job Market Preparation curriculum in each year of the bachelor’s programme

The Job Market Preparation module is divided into four different elements, which are explained below for each year of the bachelor’s programme. The four elements are:
1) Plenary sessions (co-curricular)
2) Skills education (curricular)
3) Courses including links to the job market (curricular)
4) Workshops and events (extra-curricular)

First year

The most important question in the first year is ‘What do I want?’ Students will reflect on the question: Why did I decide to study Political Science or the IRO variant? And: How does what I learn during my study programme link to my wishes for my future career? The first year will also include consideration of study skills. How should I study? How should I plan? How can I successfully complete my study programme? Four compulsory plenary sessions with the bachelor’s study advisers will take place in the first year, each of them explaining a specific topic and looking at it in more depth. In addition, the first part of the academic skills education takes place in the first year; this is divided into four themes (see below), each of which is covered in one course per block and in which students practise these skills by means of concrete assignments. This skills education is worth a total of 10 EC in the first year.

Element 1. Plenary sessions
During four plenary sessions, the bachelor’s study advisers discuss specific study skills. In the second semester, attention is also given to extra challenges for talented students. Students reflect on their own wishes and capabilities (What do I want? What can I do?).

Friday 22 September 2017, 09:00 - 11:00h, room 2.01
Friday 17 November 2017, 09:00 - 11:00h, room 2.01
Friday 23 February 2018, 13:00-15:00h, room 2.01
Friday 20 April 2018, 09:00 - 11:00h, room 2.01

*the Mentoring Sessions are mandatory

Explanation:

The first session is intended to help students find their way around the university world: what can they expect and what is expected of them? The Job Market Preparation module is introduced.
The second session looks at the questions: how can I study successfully? how should I plan? The students receive information about study skills and study management. They learn how to study effectively, plan properly (time management) and prepare effectively for the examinations (examination training).

Explanation of the third session: students have now completed the first semester of their study programme, and have therefore gained some insight into their own abilities. In this session, the possibility of engaging in extra challenges, such as the Honours track, is brought to the attention of talented students. Students who conversely need extra support are encouraged to participate in workshops, such as Time Management, Reducing Stress, Strategic Studying, Reducing Fear-of-Failure, Self-Confidence in Examinations, etc.

In the fourth plenary session, students are made aware of how important it is to give attention at an early stage to what they want to do with their study programme, and how what they learn during the study programme is linked to their wishes for their future career (building up a CV). In this context, the students are told about the LU Career Zone. With a view to achieving thorough and timely orientation on their future career, in this session with the study advisers the students reflect on their wishes, competencies and options.

Element 2. Skills education
In the first-year bachelor’s courses (1) Text Interpretation, (2) Argumentation, (3) Book Review and (4) Critical Review, students practise a number of academic skills. These skills are essential for students, not only for successfully following and completing a study programme in the (Social) Sciences, such as Political Science or International Relations and Organisations, but also during their later career as a Political Scientist. These competencies are practised and deepened in work group sessions (with a supporting digital learning environment) by means of concrete assignments that students must complete.
During the four courses (10 EC in total), students learn how to work on assignments and projects both individually and in groups, how to gain a thorough comprehension of the content of often complex texts and correctly evaluate this content, how to parse and reconstruct arguments, how to assess and develop arguments, and finally how to structure and present their findings both orally and in writing.
Whatever field of work a Political Science graduate enters – a career in the Netherlands or abroad, with the government (for instance, in an embassy, ministry, provincial government or city council) or outside it (for instance, as a journalist, consultant, political strategist for a bank, project worker with an NGO, teacher, or party worker with a political party) – these 21st century skills (interpretation, argumentation, communication and presentation skills) will ensure that this graduate is able to achieve a high standard of work performance.

Element 3. Courses including links to the job market
In addition to plenary sessions and the skills education in the first year, various first-year bachelor’s courses include clear links to the job market:
Politiek en Beleid:
guest speaker(s) working in public practice
Internationale Politiek:
guest speaker(s) working in public practice
Introduction to International Organisations:
guest speaker(s) working in public practice (especially international organisations)
Politics of the EU:

  • guest lectures by alumni (such as city council registrars, members of staff of MEPs, consultants), describing how they obtained their job, how their study programme is useful for their work, and how their organisation functions in practice

  • report assignments that require a visit to the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament, a city council or the European Parliament. (See also the summary under the heading ‘Interrelation with bachelor’s courses’ below.)
    Element 4. Workshops and events
    During the first year of their study programme, students can participate in workshops organised by POPcorner and SSO/PITSstop, which help them to find their way within the university and during their studies. The offered workshops focus on such study skills as Time Management, Reducing Stress, Strategic Studying, Self-Confidence in Examinations, etc. In these workshops, students work on skills that can help them to be more successful in their studies.
    In the context of starting to orient on the job market for Political Scientists, students can also participate in work visits and excursions in the Netherlands and abroad, which are organised by the SPIL (Study Association for Political Scientists in Leiden).

Second year

In the second year, the most important question is ‘What can I do?’ and the theme is ‘Choosing’. Among other things, attention will be given to the choices that must be made within (the third year of) the study programme. For instance, students can use their third-year elective credits to gain relevant practical experience and practise their practical skills by means of an internship or a Skills Lab elective module (in the academic year 2017-2018 it is not yet possible to earn credits with this elective module). Students reflect on their own wishes and competencies. Questions covered in this context include: ‘Which direction do I want to take with this study programme?’; ‘What options do I have for determining my direction?’; ‘What am I already good at?’ and ‘How can I optimally utilise and deploy my strengths?’ Students also orient on the job market: ‘How can I gain useful experiences and practical skills?’; ‘How can I work on my CV?’. On the basis of these questions, they choose a specific way to fill their third-year elective credits.
Two compulsory plenary sessions with the bachelor’s study advisers will take place in the second year, focusing on career orientation and academic career planning and options. In addition, a track in the context of academic skills education, worth 10 EC, also takes place in the second year; this is divided into four themes, each of which is covered in one course per block and in which students practise these skills by means of concrete assignments.

Element 1. Plenary sessions
In the first plenary session on 9 November, 10.00-11.00 in room SA41, students are informed about, among other things, the choices they can make regarding the study programme in the third year: elective courses and minors, doing an internship, and studying abroad. The purpose of this is to make students aware of all their available options, and to encourage them to think in good time about what is most appropriate for them. The emphasis in this session lies on studying abroad.
The second plenary session (mid-March) on academic career planning and options focuses on internship possibilities and ways to fill the elective credits with elective courses. Students are informed about, for instance, the Skills Lab elective module (in 2017-2018 it is not yet possible to earn credits with this module), in which students are trained in professional skills that are highly valuable for their later functioning on the job market. Students thus make an early start on developing their profile and building up a CV, with a view to thorough and timely preparation for the job market.

Element 2. Skills education
The four second-year bachelor’s courses (1) research question, (2) research design, (3) qualitative analysis, and (4) quantitative analysis are the follow-up to the first-year Academic Skills track, in which students practise the skills that are essential for their further career. These competencies are practised and deepened in work group sessions (with a supporting digital learning environment) by means of concrete assignments that students must complete. In the first year, the students were trained in interpretation, argumentation, communication and (written) presentation skills, while in the second-year skills education these 21st century skills are broadened and deepened with the next set of competencies: applying knowledge and understanding, forming judgements and communicating effectively.
During the four courses (10 EC in total), students learn how to arrive at a practicable Political Science research question and to produce a research design to investigate a societal problem in the area of Political Science. In order to find solutions, students learn how to conduct data analyses (qualitative and quantitative) that form a basis for answering the research question. Extra attention is given to how these findings are communicated and presented to the outside world. Over the second-year skills track, students are trained in the entire process of designing and conducting a socially relevant Political Science research study.

These skills are essential for Political Science graduates, whatever their future place on the job market: positions with research agencies, in politics, in the media, in consultancy, in international organisations or in the private sector. Having these transferable skills ensures that a Political Science graduate can achieve a high standard of work performance within an organisation.

Element 3. Courses including links to the job market
In addition to plenary sessions and the skills education in the second year, various second-year bachelor’s courses include components with a link to job market orientation (such as guest speakers working in the professional field, excursions, writing policy memos, etc.): [to be announced later]. (See also the summary under the heading ‘Interrelation with bachelor’s courses’ below.)

Element 4. Workshops and events
In the context of developing their profile and building up a CV, within the Job Market Preparation module students are also invited to participate in the following three events during their second year:
1) The Faculty Career Orientation (‘FLO’) Day offered by the FSBS Career Service;
2) The workshops (such as ‘Self Assessment’, ‘Career Orientation’) and/or Career Colleges offered by the FSBS Career Service;
3) The SPIL-LAP Career Event (organised for second- and third-year students), in which students speed-date with Political Science alumni working in the professional field. This event is organised by the SPIL (Study Association for Political Scientists in Leiden) and the LAP (Leiden Alumni Association for Political Scientists).

Third year

In the third year, the most important questions are ‘How do I achieve my goals?’ and ‘How do I build up relevant experience?’. Attention is given to choices that students must make after graduating, such as choice of master’s programme and career choice. The theme of career choice is covered in more depth, for instance, by means of practical job application training, which includes writing application letters, developing a profile and building up a CV, explanation of creating a LinkedIn profile, networking and interview techniques. To give students the opportunity to practise these skills, a ‘Job Application Day’ is organised by the study association (SPIL) and the FSBS Career Service, where students can participate in the various training sessions and workshops.
In addition, in the third year a ‘Career Event’ is organised by the SPIL and the alumni association for Political Scientists (LAP), where students can speed-date with Political Science alumni working in the professional field. This gives students the opportunity to engage in effective networking and to gain insight into various professional options for Political Scientists.
In the third year, the Job Market Preparation module is introduced by a plenary session led by a lecturer from the Institute of Political Science, in which students reflect and look ahead: the choice of master’s programme and orientation on the job market.

Element 1. Plenary sessions
In the third year, students are invited to two plenary sessions: 1) the Master’s Days, where students orient on possible master’s programmes after completing their bachelor’s programme and 2) the Job Application Day, where students attend training sessions in the context of job market preparation. During these sessions, they reflect on the choices they have made until then and look ahead to the preparation that is still needed for applying effectively for jobs after graduation. They receive answers to the questions: What is the professional field for Political Scientists like? Where do Leiden Political Science alumni work? As an introduction to these sessions, a detailed information document is sent to the students by email.
1) Master’s Days: An important choice that students must make during their third year in preparation for their career on the job market is which master’s programme to take after completing their bachelor’s programme. To enable them to make a well-informed choice, two information days take place during the third year: the Master’s Day in November and the Master’s Day in March; in addition, a master’s information session is organised during one of the introductory classes for the Bachelor’s Project.
2) Job Application Day: On this day, students participate in various workshops where they learn how to apply effectively for jobs. These workshops cover such topics as ‘CV, Application Letter and LinkedIn Profile’ and ‘Job Interview’. The training sessions are offered by the FSBS Career Service, and include training in practical skills that help the students to give a compelling presentation of themselves in an application letter (and a LinkedIn profile) and in a job interview, and thus to improve their chances on the job market and achieve their goals.

Element 2. Skills education
Not applicable for the third year of the bachelor’s programme.

Element 3. Courses including links to the job market
In the third year, students can fill their elective credits as they wish. They can choose to use these credits to prepare for the job market, for instance by doing an internship and/or attending the ‘Skills Lab’ (NB: in the academic year 2017-2018 it is not yet possible to earn credits with this elective module):
Students can choose elective modules in the area of 21st century skills, focusing on their professional and personal development in relation to the job market. These ‘skills workshops’ are offered by the FSBS Skills Academy, and the areas covered are Project Planning, Consultancy, Leadership and Entrepreneurship.

Another option for students is to fill the elective credits by doing an internship (15 EC) with a relevant organisation as a way to gain practical experience.

In addition, in the third year of the study programme, students also choose more in-depth follow-up courses on a range of themes. These bachelor’s courses also clearly include components (such as guest lectures by alumni, work visits to the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament, writing policy memos, opinion articles and advice reports, etc.) that are important for students’ job market orientation and preparation:

NGO’s in het Transnationale Maatschappelijk Middenveld:

  • assignment: NGO case study

  • assignment: oral presentation of NGO case study

  • Verkiezingen en Kiesgedrag:

  • assignment: policy memo for Minister of the Interior

  • assignment: opinion article for a national newspaper (Trouw, Volkskrant, NRC)

  • assignment: advice to a political party as an election expert

  • Mediatization of Politics:
    guest lecture by Political Science alumnus working in the professional field

Politics and the Media:
assignment: writing articles as a journalist

Democratie in Stad en Dorp:

  • assignment: writing a report on the standard of democracy in a specific municipality, which trains students in the skill of report writing

  • guest lectures by alumni, talking about their job and the work involved, and how they obtained this job

  • report assignments that require a visit to the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament, a city council or the European Parliament, or interviews with local politicians, media, civil servants and administrators, so that students are thoroughly trained in applying their insights to practical situations
    Bachelor’s Project: Burgemeesters in Wereldpolitiek:
    work visits to the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament, international civil servants of city councils and mayors, including visits led by alumni, in which students receive an on-site explanation of the functioning of a political party, EU support of the Lower House, or a city council (See also the summary of courses under the heading ‘Interrelation with bachelor’s courses’ below.)

Element 4. Workshops and events
In the context of career orientation, within the Job Market Preparation module, students are also invited to participate in the following events during their third year:
1) The Career Colleges of the FSBS Career Service, such as ‘Working as a Trainee’, ‘Working as a Researcher’, ‘Working in Policy’, and ‘Working in Consultancy’, which give students an insight into the job opportunities for Political Scientists;
2) The SPIL-LAP Career Event, where students speed-date with Political Science alumni and can thus build up contacts with alumni working in the professional field. This event is organised by the SPIL (Study Association for Political Scientists in Leiden) and the LAP (Leiden Alumni Association for Political Scientists);
3) The Faculty Career Orientation (‘FLO’) Day, offered by the ‘FLO’ Committee of the FSBS on 6 March 2018.

Assessment and completion

The Job Market Preparation module is a compulsory component of the study programme for students. This applies both for the courses that involve learning and practice with skills related to the job market, and for the plenary sessions given by the bachelor’s study advisers. Attendance at the various sessions is compulsory, and concrete assignments that are given must be properly completed. The plenary sessions are compulsory but no ECs are allocated to attending these sessions. ECs are, however, allocated by means of the courses that include job market preparation. For instance, the specific components of this module that take place through (the assignments within) the skills education are worth 10 EC in the first year and 10 EC in the second year. In addition, activities relating to job market preparation (such as the above-mentioned practical assignments) that take place in the context of other courses in the BSc are allocated ECs through those courses (including components chosen to fill the elective credits).
Study material
Students are not required to buy any study material for this course. Information and assignments are supplied during the sessions (or via e-mail / Blackboard).

Contact

Study adviser Danielle Lovink (Political Science and IBO), d.j.m.lovink@fsw.leidenuniv.nl
Study adviser Ariane Berends (Political Science, IBO and IRO), a.d.berends@fsw.leiduniv.nl
NB. The activities relating to job market orientation are organised in conjunction with the Student Career Centre. For additional advice and/or specific courses, please visit:
https://www.student.universiteitleiden.nl/stage-loopbaan-en-werk/loopbaan--solliciteren/loopbaanbegeleiding/loopbaanadvies/sociale-wetenschappen/politicologie-bsc?cf=sociale-wetenschappen&cd=politicologie-bsc#tab-2.

Interrelation with bachelor’s courses

Various bachelor’s courses in the Political Science study programme and the IRO variant include components and/or concrete assignments that are important for the job market orientation and preparation of Political Scientists. A summary for each course:

First- and second-year (introductory) courses:

Politiek en Beleid:
guest speakers working in public practice
Internationale Politiek:
guest speakers working in public practice
Introduction to International Organisations:
guest speakers working in public practice (especially international organisations)
Politics of the EU:

  • guest lectures by alumni (such as city council registrars, members of staff of MEPs, consultants), describing how they obtained their job, how their study programme is useful for their work, and how their organisation functions in practice

  • report assignments that require a visit to the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament, a city council or the European Parliament.

Third-year in-depth courses:

NGO’s in het Transnationale Maatschappelijk Middenveld:

  • assignment: NGO case study

  • assignment: oral presentation of NGO case study
    Verkiezingen en Kiesgedrag:

  • assignment: policy memo for Minister of the Interior

  • assignment: opinion article for a national newspaper (Trouw, Volkskrant, NRC)

  • assignment: advice to a political party as an election expert
    Mediatization of Politics:
    guest lecture by Political Science alumnus working in the professional field
    Politics and the Media:
    assignment: writing articles as a journalist
    Democratie in Stad en Dorp:

  • assignment: writing a report on the standard of democracy in a specific municipality, which trains students in the skill of report writing

  • guest lectures by alumni, talking about their job and the work involved, and how they obtained this job

  • report assignments that require a visit to the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament, a city council or the European Parliament, or interviews with local politicians, media, civil servants and administrators, so that students are thoroughly trained in applying their insights to practical situations
    Bachelor’s Project: Burgemeesters in Wereldpolitiek:
    work visits to the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament, international civil servants of city councils and mayors, including visits led by alumni, in which students receive an on-site explanation of the functioning of a political party, EU support of the Lower House, or a city council

Study Counselling

Mentoring programme

During your first study year you will receive intensive study guidance.

Your mentor in the first semester

In the Academic Skills courses (1) Text Interpretation, (2) Argumentation, (3) Book Review, and (4) Critical Review, you practice a cumulative series of academic skills that are essential to social scientific study and research. These skills will form the foundation of your study throughout the International Relations and Organisation programme. Academic course are offered in workgroup format (24 students).
The instructor of the Academic Skill courses of block 1 & 2 is also your mentor during the first semester. He/she will help you to acquire important academic skills (from searching for and correctly referring to literature, to writing an academic essay) and will help you find your way, both academically and personally. You will see your mentor weekly for the Academic Skills work group sessions. Each student will also have an individual talk with the mentor during the first semester.

Study advice during second semester

The study advisers are there throughout your studies to help you with any questions. They are the people who know most about the particular programme and the people to approach if you have any questions (on study delay, planning, examination regulations, etc.). The study advisers will guide you during the second semester and keep track of your study results for the Binding Study Advice (BSA). If you are falling behind in your studies you must inform your study adviser right away to discuss your study planning. It is also wise to let your study adviser know as soon as possible if personal circumstances are threatening to have a negative impact on your progress. You can also contact them yourself for questions and help.
The study advisers offer a mandatory Study Skills session each block. In these active sessions they will provide tools to manage your study and develop your personal skills and academic career.

Mentoring Sessions*

Friday 22 September 2017, 09:00 - 11:00h, room 2.01
Friday 17 November 2017, 09:00 - 11:00h, room 2.01
Friday 23 February 2018, 15:00-17:00h, room 2.01
Friday 20 April 2018, 09:00 - 11:00h, room 2.01
*the Mentoring Sessions are mandatory

Course and Examination Regulations (CER/OER)

You can find all regulations about the courses and exams (for instance rules about the resits or exam results) in the BSc in Political Science – International Relations and Organisations in this link:

Binding Study Advice (BSA)

During your first year of registration on a study programme your programme's Board of Examiners will send you an email concerning your academic progress on two occasions. These emails will state how far you have progressed in your studies and contain advice on the (dis)continuation of your studies based on the progress made. The advice issued midway through the academic year is non-binding and for information purposes only. The advice issued at the end of the academic year is binding. In formulating this study advice, any relevant personal circumstances, such as sickness or other personal factors, will, of course, be taken into account. If your studies are not progressing as you’d hoped, you are hindered by exceptional (personal) circumstances or if you risk being issued with negative BSA, you must contact your study adviser as soon as possible to discuss your situation.
You will receive your first, non-binding, study advice by 31 January at the latest. This advice is drawn up by the Board of Examiners after consultation with your study adviser. You will receive your BSA at the end of your first academic year, i.e. by 15 August at the latest. To be issued with positive advice, full-time students must have obtained at least 45 ECs in their first academic year. Note that a negative Binding Study Advise means that you are no longer allowed to continue the programme. See

Discontinuing your studies

You may choose to discontinue your studies at any point in the academic yearIf you are interested in restarting the IRO programme next year, you will need to deregister in Studielink before 31 January 2018. In that case, you avoid being issued with a negative Binding Study Advise at the end of the academic year.
If circumstances are preventing you from studying, please contact your study adviser.
Please note that if you are not enrolled as a student, your student visa will no longer be valid See for further information:

(Partial) tuition refund

In case you decide to formally discontinue your study, you can request a tuition refund. For further details:

Academic delay due to exceptional (personal) circumstances

Sometimes your academic progress can be hindered by exceptional (personal) circumstances. In that case you need to contact the your study adviser as soon as possible and discuss your situation. studyadvisers.iro@fsw.leidenuniv.nl

Board of Examiners Political Science

The Board of Examiners of the Institute of Political Science has been legally appointed to organise and coordinate examinations. Its main powers are described in the programme’s Course & Examination Regulations (CER), as well as its own Rules and Regulations

More programme rules and regulations Political Science.

Study plan

Study planning is an important requirement for a successful academic career. This topic will be addressed in the Academic Skills workgroups and the mentoring sessions. At the end of the first year we will ask you to draw up a study plan for the second and third year of your study. This study plan is intended to help you to define your long term planning and remain focused and motivated during the second and third year of the study. The study adviser will check your study plan and will invite you for a talk if needed.

Study advisers :

Ms. A.D. (Ariane) Berends
Ms. E.J.M (Ester) Blom
studyadvisers.iro@fsw.leidenuniv.nl

Blackboard

Blackboard
Detailed course information can be found on Blackboard. Log in with the login details sent to you by post. You must then enrol for each block on the Blackboard pages of your courses. You can find a course via the second tab ‘Courses’ (here you must enter the name of the course or the number given in the e-Prospectus). To the right of the searched course is a double arrow; click on this and you have enrolled.
Turnitin
Plagiarism is a violation of academic integrity that can have serious consequences for the perpetrator. To prevent plagiarism, all your written work is checked via Turnitin.

More info

The bachelor’s programme in outline

The first year of the bachelor’s programme consists of compulsory main courses and ‘supporting’ courses. The main courses offer a broad foundation in Political Science and International Relations, ranging from concepts, theories and approaches to research methods and statistics. An example of the ‘supporting’ courses is Economics for Political Scientists.

In the second year there are courses that provide greater depth in subfields of international relations, such as International Security and International Political Economy.

The third year of the Political Science bachelor’s programme offers considerable scope for choice, with more in-depth follow-up courses focusing on more specific international themes. The programme then concludes with a Bachelor’s Thesis in the field of international politics.

  • 2 follow-up courses (2×10 EC=) 20 EC

  • Elective courses in the 25 EC of elective credits

  • A Bachelor’s Project worth 15 EC